FanPost

Power Play Opportunities: Week 2

This is the second installment of this, hopefully, season long project to tracking interference calls and trying to find a correlation to Power Play Opportunities, PPO’s. The true measure of tracking this type of relationship should actually be taken over years as a previous article had deduced. So we’re in the phase of “will the NHL maintain a high standard in calling penalties this time around or will they swallow their whistles as years go by like the previous CBA era?”

Even though the trend should be noticed on the macro level, reviewing stats on a daily basis helps to develop that macro level and could possibly notice other factors that perusing on the macro level cannot detect. At least, that’s what I tell myself to continue to meticulous project.

Interference Penalties 2012-2013

Date

28-Jan

29-Jan

30-Jan

31-Jan

Totals A

Penalty

8

10

5

13

36

Games

5

10

4

9

28

Interference per Game

1.60

1.00

1.25

1.44

1.29

Interference Penalties 2012-2013

Date

1-Feb

2-Feb

3-Feb

Totals B

Week 2

Penalty

7

13

4

24

60

Games

7

11

4

22

50

Interference per Game

1.00

1.18

1.00

1.09

1.20

Interference Penalties 2012-2013

Date

Week 1

Week 2

Totals

Penalty

107

60

167

Games

72

50

122

Interference per Game

1.49

1.20

1.37

Reviewing the aforementioned numbers, we notice about a 30% drop in interference calls being made between week 1 and week 2. Now, let us inspect should there be a drop in PPO’s.

Power Play Opportunites, 2012-13

Date

2005/06

2011/12

22-Jan

27-Jan

3-Feb

PPO

14390

8132

312

653

1046

PPO Avg

479.6

271.1

10.4

21.8

34.9

PPOA/Game

5.84

3.31

4.45

4.53

4.29

Ana PPOA/G

5.85

3.30

2.5

2.75

3.00

Ana PPO

480

271

5

11

21

Ana Rank

16th

12th

30th

In seven days, there’s about a 25% drop in PPO’s. Within that parameter we also have shown about 30% drop in interference calls being made. There exists a direct relationship between interference calls and PPO’s in this short timed sample. Will this trend continue? I guess we will discover this query throughout the season.

Now onto a more important issue at hand, our Ducks and the PPO. We’re bucking the trend of declining opportunities! Unfortunately, we are drawing over one less penalty call per game against the NHL mean. To the rest of the NHL, it would mean that we are standing still more often than not because if any team plays a high paced, transitional game, then that team would draw more calls. That is how I would observe it from simple a statistical point of view. But our Ducks have been snake bitten by the referees on numerous occasions or the referee would allow a physical game and let things go for both teams as it was the case with the Minnesota game.

So why are we not earning more calls? Besides some odd biases by the referees, what factors are contributing to performing under the NHL mean in earning calls? Is it our style of play, is it the opposing team’s play, or are we not flopping enough? Granted, Bobby Ryan’s pirouette to the ice did earn us a penalty once in the game versus Minnesota, but it didn’t work in the following game against the Kings. And yet, oddly enough, the Kings’ managed to perform a wonderful head snap to force the referee to make a high stick call. That high quality dramatization would make many soccer fans proud!

The Ducks do possess a lot of speed players in their roster. We have two speed demons on offense, future hall of famer Teemu Selanne and the hard working, but best known for his initial projections for why he was acquired Andrew Cogliano. Both are wingers and they play on the second and third lines, respectively. There are also two very quick and very young wingers with high scoring potentials in Kyle Palmieri and Emerson Etem. Now, combine that speed with high profile scorers that grind in the likes of Ryan Getzlaf, Corey Perry, and Daniel Winnik, then one comes to wonder why the team does not generate penalty calls in favor of them? Maybe their transition game doesn’t exist? (Most of us Duck fans know our players, but just in case some don’t I’ll assume this type of approach.) Maybe the defensemen are lacking speed or vision or both?

For defense, the Ducks are represented with the best offensive defenseman for this year in all of the NHL. His line does not show it, but Cam Fowler has been the Ducks’ #1 defenseman who traverses the ice with ease on both offense and defense. Last year in a fun race amongst other Ducks’, Fowler was recorded to be the fastest player on the team, if I recall correctly, and that includes all those forwards I named, save Etem. Ladies and gentlemen, Fowler is only 21, playing out his third of year his ELC (Entry Level Contract), and is re-signed to play another five more years in Anaheim! Another player who plays a similar role to Fowler is Luca Sbisa. Another young player, Sbisa at age 23, is a fast defenseman who is still learning the ropes, but he is being sheltered with third pairing minutes. The other defensemen do not possess the speed as the young ones, but carry a lot of vision to push the puck transitionally to our fleet footed forwards. We have Beauchemin and Souray who often have their heads up ice, while Lydman usually plays a very safe, sound game. Five out of the Ducks’ six defensemen can move the puck via skate or stick. Their reserve rear guard can also move the puck both ways as Sami Vatanen’s high profile of offense and his best defensemen in his professional league award in consecutive years over the pond has the Ducks’ organization and prospects fans salivating!

With all this speed and vision described in the personnel noted, that would leave us with the factor of how the game is played. And therein lies some of the problem. There have been times the Ducks do not utilize their skates as often as they should. To make up for it, the staff has made its defensemen pinch more often in the offensive zone more often than I recall in many years of watching Ducks’ hockey. For the early part of the season, the Ducks could only boast one line that was dominating on the offensive end. That line was the third line of Cogliano-Koivu-Winnik. Outside from that line, the Ducks were unable to sustain offensive possession in the offensive zone. What could cause that inability?

The Ducks have had difficulty in finding the correct chemistry combinations in the top two scoring lines. The top line of Palmieri-Getzlaf-Perry was an okay line, but not carrying the team as it should being the number one line. The second line of Ryan-Bonino-Selanne was inept because you have two perimeter playing wingers with a slow and often overpowered center in Bonino, despite his offensive prowess. The fourth line is still in constant change as the organization has yet to decide the future of 19 year old center, Rickard Rakell. His situation reminds me of a song, “Should I stay or should I go now? If I go there will be trouble, and if I stay it will be double. So come on and let me know. This indecisions bugging me.” But I digress.

I hope chemistry is the only problem as the Ducks’ scoring has returned. We will return to our skating issues later in this article, but segue into scoring, namely the Power Play, PP. For a stretch of a four games, the PP unit went 0-11. In the last week’s installment, I denoted that the Ducks were scoring below the per game average while on the PP. Let’s inspect this week’s results:

Power Play Goals, 2012-13

Date

2005/06

2011/12

22-Jan

27-Jan

3-Feb

PPG

2545

1408

73

132

208

PPG Avg

84.8

46.9

2.43

4.4

6.9

PPGA/Game

1.03

0.57

1.04

0.92

0.85

Ana PPGA/G

1.06

0.55

1.50

0.75

1.00

Ana PPG

87

45

3

3

7

Rank

13th

PP Efficiency

18.1%

16.6%

33.3%

PPE Rank

15th

21st

3rd

I’ll admit I panicked when it comes to our PP being inept. In four games between the two weeks, the Ducks were shut out from the gift of the power play. Earning limited amount of PPO’s has me overreacting about our PP efficiency. We’re ranked third overall in the NHL! We make our chances count. The only problem is we’re not consistent at it. We’ve been a feast or famine type PP unit. The team had gone 0 for 12 before Bobby Ryan slid a wonderful pass from Teemu for its first PP goal late in the third period in five games. The ketsup continued pouring the next day as the Ducks went 3 for 4 against the Kings. In the last two games, the PP unit went 4 for 6. Can the Ducks heed coach Boudreau’s mantra that good teams are consistent day in and day out? I hope we have figured out the PP unit. The only thing I can pinpoint that could help would be to sit Beleskey and insert an actual sniper in his place, Palmieri. The same Palmieri that was the recipient of a tic-tac-toe passing on the last PP goal made by the Ducks with a kneeling rocket.

Added Bonus Content: Our PK

I had mentioned that we were lacking PPO’s because of how our game is designed or played. We have speed and vision, but lacking PPO. The way the Ducks play their game may also be a hindrance to their Penalty Killing units. The PK unit possesses speed, big bodies, and experience; yet does not show dominance.

Penalty Killing, 2012-13

Team

Stat

3-Feb

NHL

TSH

1046

NHL Avg

TSH

34.9

NHLA/G

TSH

4.29

Ana /G

TSH

3.71

Ana

TSH

26

Ana Rank

TSH

28th

NHL

PPGA

208

NHL Avg

PPGA

6.93

NHLA/G

PPGA

0.85

Ana/G

PPGA

1.29

Ana

PPGA

9

Ana Rank

PPGA

7th

NHL Avg

PK Eff

79.7

Ana

PK Eff

65.4

Ana Rank

PK Eff

29th

TSH = Times Short Handed, PPGA = Power Play goals Against,

PK Eff = Penalty Kill efficiency

As a team, the Ducks are disciplined as they rank at 28th at being short handed. Unfortunately, when they are short handed they are unable to prevent the puck from lighting the lamp. I hope it’s just due to lack of chemistry on the PK unit. The personnel looks strong on paper, but the execution is amiss as I’ve noticed players not accounting for player down by the net.

I haven’t spent much time dissecting the PK and I don’t have much to refer to as this is the first time I have focused on the PK this year. This could lead off into a spin off article, but as of right now, it’s simply to collect the data into one chart for us to say ohhh, ahhh, and dadgummit!



This article is user-generated. It does not necessarily reflect the views of Anaheim Calling. Please do not link this article as representative of Anaheim Calling content or viewpoints . . . unless it's <em>really</em> really good.

X
Log In Sign Up

forgot?
Log In Sign Up

Forgot password?

We'll email you a reset link.

If you signed up using a 3rd party account like Facebook or Twitter, please login with it instead.

Forgot password?

Try another email?

Almost done,

By becoming a registered user, you are also agreeing to our Terms and confirming that you have read our Privacy Policy.

Join Anaheim Calling

You must be a member of Anaheim Calling to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at Anaheim Calling. You should read them.

Join Anaheim Calling

You must be a member of Anaheim Calling to participate.

We have our own Community Guidelines at Anaheim Calling. You should read them.

Spinner.vc97ec6e

Authenticating

Great!

Choose an available username to complete sign up.

In order to provide our users with a better overall experience, we ask for more information from Facebook when using it to login so that we can learn more about our audience and provide you with the best possible experience. We do not store specific user data and the sharing of it is not required to login with Facebook.

tracking_pixel_9355_tracker